Tuesday, 15 March 2011

HINDKO BOARD



The basic principles of writing the text of Hindko is going to be finalized under the Patronage of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Government. This was disclosed by Dr. Fazalur Rahim, the chairman of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Text Book Board Peshawar, during his address in 5 th Multilingual and Cultural Conference, was Organised by Gandhara Hindko Board Pakistan , held on December, 25 and 26, 2010.
Representatives of the communities of round about thirty languages of the Province were attending the historic crowded events of the two days conference at Peshawar . The Chairman of TBB had promised that he was going to recently convene a 2 nd faze of the meeting of learned people to finalize the basic principles to fromulate the letters of Hindko language. WE witnessesed that the promise became true at the moment, I was invited to attend the meeting on Wednesday, January 19, 2011 . We reached on the schedal date and time in the conferece room of TBB.
An eversmiling lady Miss Farzana Maroof was there saying warm welcome to the participants on behalf of Khyber Pakhtoonkhwa Text Book Board Peshawar. She was sitting with her laptop which was connected with a projector to display her representation on the screen hanging on stand. Mr. Sultan Sakoon, Haider Zaman Haider, Professor Dr. Muhammad Dawood, Abdul Waheed Bismil, Muhammad Nawaz and Imtiazul Haq Imtiaz came from Hazar Region, one Jan Muhammad Atif reached from Kohat, while Hassam Hur, Ziaud Din Siddiqi, Sheen Shaukat and Sabir Hussain Iamdad were attending the meeting from Hindko Literary Circles of Peshawar.
Dr. Fazal ur Rahim, the chairman of TBB paid welcome address and told the importance of Hindko language among other mother tongues scattered all around the province. He expressed satisfaction on the dozens of Hindko books were induidualy printed by Hindko lovers or some Hindko Literary Organizations.
The days are coming soon, that the authors of Hindko books will not spend lot of money to publish and distribute them free of cost. Text Book Board will feel pleasure to publish the standard literary and technicla material of Hindko language, added the chairman.
Miss farzana maroof briefed the agenda of the meeting by her presentation showing the power point slides on hanging screen, through her laptop and attached projecting machieneries. Could be summarized as below:

Objectives of Today's Meeting

1Major Regional Languages
2 Brain Storming
3  Sharing Ideas
4 How to move ahead

Key Points to be discussed

  1. Hindko as a regional language (Background)
  2. Types of material developed so far
  3. Status of Hindko Alphabets
  4. How to come to the consensus
  5. Steps to be taken in the regards
    1. Identification of experts
    2. Meeting to get their views
    3. Discussion on one common script
  6. Initiative on curriculum development

What to do next

  1. Formation of focus groups (Area wise)
  2. Schedule of their meetings
  3. Distribution of tasks.
Professor Dr. Muhammad Daud Awan distributed the Photostat copies of a set of alphabet proposed Allama Iqbal Open University. Another set of alphabet was exhibited by a student ofregional languages, being spoken in the province. Muhammad Nawz, the student of linguistic showed his work on the screen with the help of laptop and projector. This set of alphabet was recommended by Professor Dr. Ilahi Bakhsh Akhtar Awan, his teacher, disclosed the student Nawaz.
Mr. Hassam Hur submitted his printed work entitled “Hindko Da Pehla Qaida,” the first set of Principles letters, a booklet, he had published few years ago using his own resources. Sabir Hussain Imadad also proposed a set of basic letters, was published in his hindko book “Wadkarai”.
Hot and stormy debate took place at the moment of Brain Storming session. It took lot of time to discuss on several aspects of the topic, and a committee was ultimately framed, consisted on the following office holders:
Chairman: Professor Dr. Muhammad Daud Awan
Secretary: Muhammad Nawaz
Joint Secretary: Muhammad Zia ud Din Siddiqi
Other participants of the meeting are considered as members of the new framed committee. The office bearers are advised to put their report as soon as possible, so that the next faze of the meeting should be announced to convene

Demographics

The speakers of Hindko live primarily in six districts: MansehraAbbottabadHaripurPeshawarNowshera and Kohat in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Attock and Rawalpindi in Punjab and parts of Pakistan-administered Kashmir including Muzaffarabad; Jonathan Addleton states that "Hindko is the linguistic majority in the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, represented in nearly one-third of the province's total households." (Pakhtunkhwa referring to Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province.) In Abbottabad District 88 per cent of households reported speaking Hindko, in Mansehra District 77 per cent, in Peshawar District 17 per cent, and in Kohat District 10 per cent (1986). Testing of inherent intelligibility among Hindko dialects through the use of recorded tests has shown that there is a northern (Hazara) dialect group and a southern group. The southern dialects are more widely understood throughout the dialect network than are the northern dialects. The dialects of rural Peshawar and Talagang disstrict attock are the most widely understood of the dialects tested. The dialect of Balakot is the least widely understood.
In most Hindko-speaking areas, speakers of Pashto live in the same or neighbouring communities (although this is less true in Abbottabad and Kaghan Valley than elsewhere). In Abottabad, it is now being advanced due to usage of Urdu words. It is spoken by the Mashwanis, Jadoons, Tanoli, Mughals, and Awans. In the mixed areas, many people speak both languages. The relationship between Hindko and Pashto is not one of stable bilingualism. In the north east, Hindko is the dominant language both in terms of domain of usage and in terms of the number of speakers, whereas in the south west, Pashto seems to be advancing in those same areas.
The Gandhara Hindko Board has published the first dictionary of the language and its launching ceremony was held on March 16, 2003. According to a press release, Sultan Sakoon, a prominent Hindko poet, compiled the dictionary.
Some Hindko speakers are found in northern India because after the partition of India, many Hindu Hindko speakers emigrated to India, preserving their language and passing it on to their children.[5]Hindko speakers are also found through out Afghanistan, where they are known as Hindkis, and primarily practice Hinduism.[8]

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Demographics

The speakers of Hindko live primarily in six districts: MansehraAbbottabadHaripurPeshawarNowshera and Kohat in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Attock and Rawalpindi in Punjab and parts of Pakistan-administered Kashmir including Muzaffarabad; Jonathan Addleton states that "Hindko is the linguistic majority in the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, represented in nearly one-third of the province's total households." (Pakhtunkhwa referring to Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province.) In Abbottabad District 88 per cent of households reported speaking Hindko, in Mansehra District 77 per cent, in Peshawar District 17 per cent, and in Kohat District 10 per cent (1986). Testing of inherent intelligibility among Hindko dialects through the use of recorded tests has shown that there is a northern (Hazara) dialect group and a southern group. The southern dialects are more widely understood throughout the dialect network than are the northern dialects. The dialects of rural Peshawar and Talagang disstrict attock are the most widely understood of the dialects tested. The dialect of Balakot is the least widely understood.
In most Hindko-speaking areas, speakers of Pashto live in the same or neighbouring communities (although this is less true in Abbottabad and Kaghan Valley than elsewhere). In Abottabad, it is now being advanced due to usage of Urdu words. It is spoken by the Mashwanis, Jadoons, Tanoli, Mughals, and Awans. In the mixed areas, many people speak both languages. The relationship between Hindko and Pashto is not one of stable bilingualism. In the north east, Hindko is the dominant language both in terms of domain of usage and in terms of the number of speakers, whereas in the south west, Pashto seems to be advancing in those same areas.
The Gandhara Hindko Board has published the first dictionary of the language and its launching ceremony was held on March 16, 2003. According to a press release, Sultan Sakoon, a prominent Hindko poet, compiled the dictionary.
Some Hindko speakers are found in northern India because after the partition of India, many Hindu Hindko speakers emigrated to India, preserving their language and passing it on to their children.[5]Hindko speakers are also found through out Afghanistan, where they are known as Hindkis, and primarily practice Hinduism.[8]

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Pakistan's Hindko Muslim speakers

Villagers (low res.)


Pakistan's Hindko Muslim speakers


One language, many tribes

Possibly five million people in northern Pakistan are Hindko speakers. This is more than the population of Norway and about the same as Turkmenistan. Made up of several ethnic groups, mostly Pathans and Moghuls, the Hindko are more of a language group than a people group.
Hindko speakers make their living as farmers or merchants in the foothills of the Himalayas. Corn and wheat are the most important crops. These grains are ground into flour and used to make a flat bread that accompanies every meal. The people lead very simple lives, but often go to great lengths to secure an education and a better future for their children. Only about 25% of Hindko speakers can read in any language.

Compared to their Pashto-speaking relatives, Hindko speakers are know for being gentle and peace-loving. They even tend to be more open-minded than their neighbours. Still, only a handful of Hindko speakers are followers of Jesus. At the same time, economic disparities and political disenfranchisement have led many of these gentle people to seek change through Islamic fundamentalism. The local school system has been largely taken over by fundamentalists which has sometimes even led young men from poor families into terrorist organisations.

Looking for Answers

The devastating earthquake of October 2003 caused deaths in nearly every Hindko-speaking family. Even today, many are still looking for a new livelihood, permanent housing, and answers to their deeper questions. Interest in reading the New Testament remains high, but the Word of God in Hindko is not yet available in print. Most have never had an opportunity to hear the Gospel.

hindko poetry


Hindko (ہندکو, हिन्दको [hindkou̯]), also Hindku, or Hinko,[2] is part of the Lahnda subgroup[3] of Indo-Aryan languages spoken by Hindkowans in Pakistan and northern India,[4][5] some Pashtun tribes in Pakistan, as well as by the Hindki people of Afghanistan. Hindko, has also been interpreted to mean the language of India and most probably Indus which of course is the source of etymology for all these words.[6] The word Hindko has also been interpreted to mean the language of India.[7] The term is also found in Greek references to the mountainous region in eastern Afghanistan and northern Pakistan as Καύκασος Ινδικός (Caucasus Indicus, or Hindu Kush). The language is spoken in the areas of the North West Frontier Province (including Hazara), Punjab(including Attock), and Pakistan Administered Kashmir.
There is no generic name for these people because they belong to diverse ethnicities and tend to identify themselves by the larger families or castes. However the people of the largest group in the districts of Haripur, Abbottabad and Mansehra are sometimes recognised collectively asHazarawal, named after the defunct Hazara Division that comprised these districts. In Peshawar city they are called Peshawari or "Kharay" by Pashtuns meaning City-dwellers.


History and origin



uring the pre-Islamic era in present day Pakistan, the language of the masses was refined by the ancient grammarian Pāṇini, who set the rules of an ancient language called Sanskrit which was used principally for Hindu scriptures (analogous to Latin in the Western world). Meanwhile, the vernacular language of the masses, Prakrit developed into many tongues and dialects which spread over the northern parts of South Asia. Hindko is believed to be closely related to Prakrit. It has undergone very little grammatical corruption, but has borrowed considerable vocabulary from its neighbours, in particular Pashto. It shows close affinity to Punjabi and the Lahnda sub-group of Indo-Aryantongues and can be sub-divided into a northern and southern dialect (the southern dialect shows some similarity withSaraiki as opposed to Punjabi). On the language is mutually intelligible with other Lahnda dialects such as Pothwariand western Punjabi.


Speakers

The largest geographically contiguous group of Hindko speakers is concentrated in the districts of state Abbottabad,HaripurMansehraAttock, of Pakistan, while there are a substantial number of speakers of Hindko in cities likePeshawar, Nowshera, Swabi and Kohat of Khyber Pukhtunkhwa province of Pakistan and parts of both Kashmirs.
People who speak Hindko are referred to by some academics as Pathans probably because of the many Pashtun tribes, for example shilmani/sulemani, Mashwanis,Jadoons, Tareen, TanolisDilazaks, who settled in places like Hazara, adopted Hindko as their first language and gained political power in these areas during the British rule, and also because of many ethnic Pashtuns such as KakarAlizaiDurraniPopalzaiSadozaibangashkhattak,yousafzai, Ghaznavi and Khogyani, etc who speak Hindko as their first language in Peshawar and Kohat are Pashtuns by origin. The Hindko speaking people living in major cities PeshawarKohatNowshera,and Attock are bilingual in Pashto and Hindko. Similarly many Pashto speaking people in districts like Abbottabad and Mansehra (especially in Agror Valley and northern Tanawal) have become bilingual in Pashto and Hindko.
The Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Imperial Gazetteer (1905) refers to the language as Hindko. More than one interpretation has been offered for the term Hindko. Some associate it with Hindustan (as the word may have been used during the medieval Muslim period in the Indian subcontinent), others with the Indus River which is of course the etymological source of all these terms. Farigh Bukhari and South Asian language expert and historian Christopher Shackle believe that Hindko was a generic term applied to the Indo-Aryan dialect continuum in the northwest frontier territories and adjacent district of Attock in the Punjab province to differentiate it from Pashto.
Linguists classify the language into the Indic subgroup of Indo-European languages and consider it to be one of the Indo-Iranian languages of the area. An estimated 2.4 per cent of the total population of Pakistan speak Hindko as their mother tongue, with more rural than urban households reporting Hindko as their household language.


Hindko poetry

This blog which will introduce the poetry of hindko language.
No web site is available on internet regarding the hindko poetry and I like my mother tongue